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OCRS Workshop

Make a Joyful Noise

An Orange County Recorder Society Workshop

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Trinity Episcopal Church,
2400 Canal Street in Orange, California

The voice is our oldest instrument. But end-blown flutes like the recorder weren’t far behind, and that’s not an accident. As with singing, breath, articulation, and phrasing lie at the heart of recorder playing. We’ll “sing” music inspired by, or intended for, our purest form of musical expression.

We are pleased to announce that OCRS will be hosting their annual Recorder Workshop on Saturday, February 17th. This season we are fortunate to have 2 outstanding up-and-coming musicians, performers, teachers in the country. Anne Timberlake from St Louis and Miyo Aoki from Seattle. To learn more about them see https://www.ocrecorders.org/ocrs-workshop-2018/

Workshop details: 
• Registration & Coffee: 9:00 a.m.
• Workshop: 9:30 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.
• Refreshments & Lunch will be provided
Small-group, ability-level sessions will be taught by both clinicians; and they will switch groups so that everyone will have the opportunity to benefit from both of them. There will also be a full group (tutti) orchestra session.

Workshop session schedule, directions and music will be sent by email to all participants a few days prior to the workshop. Please print and bring your music.

For more information or questions contact: Win Aldrich at 909-625-7722 or winaldrich@earthlink.net.

Here is the flyer and registration form: OCRS Workshop2018.

 

A Message from ARS President

Thank you for making a recorder community! Thank you, thank you, thank you! The American Recorder Society thanks you for all you do. • Thank you for clapping for your friends, no matter what.
• Thank you for explaining to airport security what those tubes are that you are carrying.
• Thank you for moving furniture so your friends can come over and play.
• Thank you for practicing sopranino in the basement, when requested.
• Thank you for sharing your instruments, but not your colds.
• Thank you for overcoming stage fright.
• Thank you for happily answering when asked, “Isn’t that what 2nd graders play?”
• Thank you for playing songs that were hits before your mother’s mother’s mother’s mother’s mother’s mother’s mother’s mother’s mother was born.
• Thank you for your passion for the recorder. We want to celebrate you, to celebrate all the ways you support our recorder community. Keep an eye out this month for the stories you’ve made possible and get ready to hear it over and over: thank you.
From all of us at the American Recorder Society, thank you for being a member of our community.

Yours, David Podeschi, ARS Board President

Refreshments

We want to thank Mike Nicholes and David Thomforde for the refreshments at the November meeting. We would also like to thank the Lieblang family and Jayanthi (Jay) Wijekoon for always helping with the clean-up after the break. The refreshments for the upcoming December meeting will be supplied by Win Aldrich, Marcy del Clements, and Gloria Martin. Please contact Jim Forrest: stringpresser@earthlink.net, to sign up for a turn to treat the group, or catch him at the next meeting to sign up.

President’s Message for November

There are three things that come together to make OCRS a strong, continuing gathering of recorder players. The first is a Board of dedicated volunteers who work to provide enjoyable monthly meetings, send the music to you in a timely convenient manner, ensure that we have refreshments to enjoy at each meeting, and provide a workshop of playing and learning together. The second is access to a large number of very talented conductors who bring their skills and knowledge to our monthly meetings. The third is a stable number of paying members who provide the necessary resources to continue. To date approximately one-half of last year’s members have paid their dues for the 2017–2018 season. Without these resources OCRS cannot continue to exist—do I need to say more?

Win Aldrich

OCRS Dues

Time to pay your dues!

A membership application is included in here. Please pay your dues before or at the September meeting. Please include a completed membership application with your dues payment in order to provide OCRS with your up-to-date contact information and your election whether to print your own sheet music.

If you intend to pay your dues in cash at the meeting, please complete the membership application and place it in an envelope with your money, write your name on the outside of the envelope, and then seal the envelope before giving it to the Treasurer. If paying by check at the meeting, please paper-clip or staple your check to your completed application. Alternatively, you may mail your dues check and completed application to the Treasurer at the address shown on the application.

—Susan Mason, Treasurer

OCRS Workshop, Saturday, February 17th

Save the date!

Workshop details and registration materials will be available later this Fall. We are pleased to announce that OCRS will be hosting their annual Recorder Workshop on Saturday, February 17th. This season we are fortunate to have 2 outstanding up-and-coming musicians, performers, teachers in the country. Anne Timberlake from St Louis and Miyo Aoki from Seattle.

Anne Timberlake has appeared across the United States performing repertoire from Bach to twenty-first-century premieres to Celtic tunes. She holds degrees in recorder performance from Oberlin Conservatory, where she studied with Alison Melville, and Indiana University, where she studied with Eva Legene and won the 2007 Early Music Institute Concerto Competition. Critics have praised her “fine technique and stylishness,” “unexpectedly rich lyricism” (Letter V), and “dazzling playing” (Chicago Classical Review).

Anne has received awards from the American Recorder Society and the National Foundation for the Advancement of the Arts, and was awarded a Fulbright Grant. With Musik Ekklesia, Anne has recorded for the Sono Luminus label.

Anne is a founding member of the ensemble Wayward Sisters, specializing in music of the early baroque. In 2011, Wayward Sisters won Early Music America’s Naxos Recording Competition. Wayward Sisters released their debut CD on the Naxos label in 2014.

Anne enjoys teaching as well as playing. In addition to teaching private, group and online recorder lessons, Anne has coached through Indiana University’s Pre-College Recorder Program, the San Francisco Early Music Society, the Amherst Early Music Festival, Virginia Baroque Performance Institute, Mountain Collegium, and for numerous ARS chapters. Anne currently resides in St. Louis, MO. And is a Board Member of The American Recorder Society.

Miyo Aoki is a dedicated recorder player and teacher, performing music ranging from medieval to modern and teaching students of all ages and levels. She has performed in the US, Germany, and Poland, with groups including Salish Sea Players, Utopia Early Music, and Gamut Bach Ensemble, and at the Bloomington Early Music Festival and Whidbey Island Music Festival. She is a founding member of the Seattle-based chamber group sound|counterpoint and has premiered works by contemporary composers Natalie Williams, David Schneider and Agnes Dorwarth.

Miyo holds a KAZ Diplom (Artist Diploma) from the University of the Arts in Bremen, Germany, where she studied with Professor Han Tol. While living in Bremen, she also maintained a private studio and worked in the musical outreach program “Musik-im-Ohr”, based in the Bremen concert hall, Die Glocke. She holds degrees in both early music performance and mathematics from Indiana University, where she studied with Professor Eva Legêne and received the Austin B. Caswell award for her paper on Ars Subtilior music.

Miyo is a strong proponent of music education and strives to make music accessible to people from varied backgrounds. She has collaborated in planning and performing several outreach programs for children, including “Shakespeare’s Ear” and “Oskar und die Blockflötendiebe”.

She teaches privately, has taught for the Indiana University Pre-College Recorder Program, the Port Townsend Early Music Workshop, and SFEMS Recorder Workshop.

President’s Message

Where has the Summer gone? I hope that all of you have had a wonderful break.The first meeting of the 2017–2018 Season will be conducted by Russ Wilson who has promised several more of his wonderful arrangements for us to enjoy. Some good news—I am happy to report that several people stood up and volunteered to help with putting on the OCRS Recorder Workshop this year. It will be on Saturday, February 17th, and I want to thank Gloria Martin, Lee Waggener, Bill Waggener, and Gwen Rodman for making this happen. As listed in the Workshop section of the newsletter, we will have 2 highly skilled (but not well known in Southern California) players, performers, and teachers: Anne Timberlake from St. Louis, and Miyo Aoki from Seattle. Several of us have had the pleasure of studying under them at workshops over the last several years and I am sure that you will both enjoy and learn much from both of them.

The schedule of conductors is shaping up well and we will have some old favorites back again as well as a new face, Adam Bregman, from the DMA program at USC studying under Adam and Rotem Gilbert. It is amazing how much Adam and Rotem have changed the depth, breadth, enthusiasm for Early Music here in Southern California (as well as Nationally/Internationally) for the benefit of all of us fans.

I just got back from a whitewater rafting trip with our grandchildren on the Green River in Colorado/Utah and one of the guides made a comment as we headed in kayaks down a particularly difficult section that I was reminded of when I read the latest blog posting from Anne Timberlake-“always follow a positive direction”

See you the 8th,

—Win Aldrich

The Power of Positive Framing: Dos and Don’ts

from Anne Timberlake’s blog

Don’t think about an elephant!

Especially not its long trunk. And definitely don’t think about its grey ears. No tusks either!

Is it working? 

I’ll wager a recorder or two that the answer is no, and that there’s a large pachyderm currently sitting atop your consciousness.

It’s not your fault, of course—it’s the way our brains work. In trying to avoid thinking about something, or trying to avoid doing something, you’re automatically activating the mental representation of whatever it is you’re trying to escape.

And for those of us who are trying to break a bad playing habit, that’s a significant obstacle.

Fortunately there’s a simple solution.

Think of a gorilla.

Black fur, long arms, agile fingers…. Now the elephant is gone.

How does this translate to recorder playing? When I’m seeking to break a student’s bad habit, I’m most effective when I frame the task positively. Rather than asking the student not to do something, I ask the student to do something else.

Action as opposed to avoidance, doing as opposed to not doing. This can be a magical reframe. Instead of working to avoid an undesirable behavior (a difficult and often dispiriting task), the student is instead working toward adopting a desirable behavior (a challenging but inspiring task). A do, not a don’t.

Instead of asking a student to stop making breath accents, I ask for a beautiful and consistent airstream.

Instead of telling a student to stop rushing, I invite them to pay attention to every subdivision of the beat.

In my own playing, one of my struggles is not to break character so quickly at the ends of pieces and movements.

Recently, I realized I needed a reframe, and now, instead of working on not flinging down the instrument too soon, I’m working toward enjoying that particular stillness after the final note.

Refreshments

We want to thank Win Aldrich, Marcyn Del Clements, Gloria Martin, and Gwen Rodman for the refreshments at the June meeting. We would also like to thank the Lieblang family and Jayanthi (Jay) Wijekoon for always helping with the clean-up after the break.

The refreshments for the upcoming September meeting will be supplied by Sean Lieblang, Susan Mason, Sandy Thompson, and Russ Wilson.

Please contact Jim Forrest: stringpresser@earthlink.net, or 626-333-3443 to sign up for a turn to treat the group, or catch him at the next meeting to sign up.

Time to Pay Your Dues

dollar signA membership application is included here.  Please pay your dues before or at the September meeting.  Please include a completed membership application with your dues payment in order to provide OCRS with your up-to-date contact information and your election whether to print your own sheet music.

If you intend to pay your dues in cash at the meeting, please complete the membership application and place it in an envelope with your money, write your name on the outside of the envelope, and then seal the envelope before giving it to the Treasurer.  If paying by check at the meeting, please paper-clip or staple your check to your completed application.  Alternatively, you may mail your dues check and completed application to the Treasurer at the address shown on the application.

Remember dues cover approximately 75% of the operating costs of OCRS to bring world-class conductors each month for your playing enjoyment and learning. Donations are much needed and appreciated so please consider  donating what you can. OCRS is a tax-exempt Section 501©(3) organization and has comparable tax-exempt status under California law. Donations to OCRS may be tax-deductible.

 Susan Mason, Treasurer